Welcome
  Your Account | Cart Cart | Wish List | Help
SearchBrowse
Subjects
BestsellersThe New York Times®
Best Sellers
MagazinesCorporate
Accounts
e-books
& docs
Bargain
Books
Used
Books
Search     
Web Search
View CartWish ListYour AccountHelp
Join Amazon Prime and ship Two-Day for free and Overnight for $3.99. Already a member? Sign in .

book Information
  Explore this item
   buying info
   customer reviews
   editorial reviews
   look inside

Listmania!


My own Favorites: A list by gene_amiga, MScIs

Add your List


Ready to buy?


Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
a9.com   A9.com users save 1.57% on Amazon. Learn how.

Don't have one?
We'll set one up for you.
SVG Essentials (O'Reilly XML)
by J. David Eisenberg

List Price: $34.95
Price: $23.07 and eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25. See details
You Save: $11.88 (34%)
Availability: Usually ships within 24 hours. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Only 4 left in stock--order soon (more on the way).

Want it delivered Friday, June 24? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. See details

Edition: Paperback




Better Together
Buy this book with SVG Programming by Kurt Cagle today!
plus
Total List Price: $84.90
Buy Together Today: $56.04


Links you might be interested in
adidas clothing
maternity wear
microsoft office software
party dress
eyewear


Editorial Reviews
Amazon.com
SVG Essentials opens the door to the rich language that underpins this emerging and fast-growing graphics language. Scalable Vector Graphics, which are described through text like a programming language and can be read on any computer platform with the appropriate viewer, hold great promise for the Web designer who knows how to take advantage of the latent power. This book helps to harness that power.

It's important to note that this book is not written for Web designers looking to add SVG graphics to their sites, but rather for Web programmers who need to add such graphics based on information extracted from a database, or who want to add them by hand. If you have or use an application that can export or embed SVG graphics, you may not need this book. However, if you are looking to create dynamic images that get created on the fly, or perhaps be able to draw graphics based on information from the user or from a database, you've come to the right book.

Although only 330 pages, the book offers 13 chapters and six appendices. Everything from a basic overview of the SVG language through practical examples to the finer points of serving SVG files over the Web is thoroughly detailed, and each chapter is concisely written and rich with screenshots, illustrations, and code examples.

O'Reilly has earned a positive reputation for publishing outstanding technical books, and SVG Essentials makes a fine addition to their lineup. The SVG graphics standard is rapidly gaining ground. Backed by important vendors as Adobe, SVG is poised to be a powerful tool in the arsenal of today's Web designer. Keep this book within arm's reach of any SVG developer or Web designer who wants to take advantage of this emerging and powerful technology. --Mike Caputo

From Book News, Inc.
This guide to Scalable Vector Graphics provides instruction on creating SVG files, transforming other XML data to SVG, using Javascript to manipulate the SVG object tree, and serving SVG graphics on the Web.Copyright © 2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

See all Editorial Reviews


Product Details
  • Paperback: 364 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly; 1 edition (February 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN: 0596002238
  • Product Dimensions: 9.0 x 6.0 x 1.0 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds. (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: based on 5 reviews.
  • Amazon.com Sales Rank: #141,733 in Books
  • (Publishers and authors: improve your sales)

Look Inside This Book
Browse Sample Pages:
Front Cover | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover

Customers interested in SVG Essentials (O'Reilly XML) may also be interested in
Sponsored Links ( What's this? ) Feedback
  • SVG Authoring: RapidSVG
    Programming-free SVG Authoring tool SVG animations, web sites, and more
    xstreamsvg.com/

  • Visual SVG Editor
    Create Interactive Animation in SVG without programing - Download Now
    www.VirtualMechanics.com

  • Free SVG Editor
    Edit Scalable Vector Graphics Files Edit, Validate and Transform SVG!
    www.stylusstudio.com



Spotlight Reviews
Write an online review and share your thoughts with other customers.

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful:

Good introduction, needs more recipes, March 22, 2004
Reviewer:Jack D. Herrington "engineer and author" (Silicon Valley, CA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   (REAL NAME)  
The book provides a solid introduction to SVG through an increasingly complex set of examples of SVG use. It is well written and edited, it also provides a thorough description of the entirety of the standard. What it lacks is more depth in the area of recipes for commonly used image effects. It also needs more advice about how complex SVGs are organized and built for efficiency. I understand that SVG is still on the adoption curve, so perhaps we could see these improvements in a second version of the book when the standard has picked up a little more.

For the time being the book earns it's four stars by providing a nice learning curve and having high quality examples that demonstrates the concepts effectively.

Was this review helpful to you?  YesNo (Report this)



18 of 22 people found the following review helpful:

In a Nutshell, March 16, 2002
Reviewer:Wesley T. Perkins (New Orleans, LA United States) - See all my reviews
This subject perfectly fits O'Reilly's "In a Nutshell" tradition, for SVG itself is just that: Web design, including text, graphics, animation, and programming, all in a nutshell -- concise, pithy, simple, and deep.

SVG, a refactoring of several generations of Web technology and a public standard approved by the World Wide Web Consortium, can be authored without any special tools and without any special background, other than the immediately productive background provided by this book.

Eisenberg swiftly, but with diverting variety, illuminates the process of drawing, assembling shapes, creating textures, transforming coordinates, structuring documents, enriching text, creating reusable components, fine tuning color, animating shapes and colors and structures, creating lighting effects, and programming user interactions. All of this is built upon the simple SVG architecture: arrange your elements in a hierarchy and set their attributes.

There is an art to conveying important points without belaboring them and Eisenberg moves from example to example with perfect pitch.

The book also contains an eight page section with full color images.

Some people have complained about the lack of reference books on SVG. The SVG reference is in fact widely available, all 500+ pages of it, on the W3C site. What is really needed, and would have been useful in this or any SVG book, is a five page guide to using that reference -- how do I, in ten seconds or so, determine whether this element can be a child of that element, or if this element supports this attribute?

While I was developing SVG Composer the only book available was Watt's "Designing SVG Web Graphics" (another fine book with a rather different pitch). When Eisenberg's work came out I happily relearned SVG, doing every example and picking up any number of new tricks.

I do have some reservations: I didn't care for the cat drawing (hated it!) and the final two chapters on generating and serving SVG seemed aimed at the wrong audience (adepts at Java, servlets, and Perl) though the material itself is perfectly fine.

At first I had the same feeling about the appendices, which include brief samples of subjects from programming to fonts to matrix algebra, that surely Eisenberg was misjudging his audience. However he may have things just right -- SVG may well become the greatest crossover hit ever in computer languages, a lingua franca for logic and art.

Was this review helpful to you?  YesNo (Report this)



Customer Reviews
Average Customer Review:
Write an online review and share your thoughts with other customers.

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful:

Best ORA book since HTML: The Definitive Guide, October 2, 2002
Reviewer:"ano202" (Somerville, MA United States) - See all my reviews
While it's difficult to separate my excitement over SVG from the contents of this book, it's quite possible that the two are so directly related as to be inseperable. Within a few hours of buying this book, I was producing and printing extremely high quality images that I had found all but impossible to produce w/other technologies (JPEG codecs, etc.). If you are familiar with the basic mark-up language concepts, then you should have no trouble gleaning the essential elements of SVG.

After an excellent introductory chapter that provides a general overview, subsequent chapters cover aspects of SVG in detail, such as how to create basic shapes or generate text. One thing I particularly liked was that the author mostly uses a single example (SVG code to create a picture of a cat) to illustrate new concepts, creating a sense of cohesiveness that tied the chapters together. This book is *not* just a scattershot collection of essays that characterizes so many other technical books -- the text is clear, concise, and to the point. Finally, there is a very uselful appendix that summarizes the most frequently used attributes.

Perhaps the only drawback is that if you are coming to SVG from a non-technical background, you might find this book a little too gear-headed for your liking. For technical readers that want a thorough introduction (i.e., not a PhD thesis) to this exciting and useful technology, however, this book is a must.

Was this review helpful to you?  YesNo (Report this)



5 of 13 people found the following review helpful:

Good starter book, but..., September 26, 2002
Reviewer: A reader
Not a bad book if you want to learn just the basics; however, I think you can easily find everything in this book on the Web if you take the time to dig around. If you're looking for a book to get you started, this one will do nicely. But if you're looking for more advanced/esoteric SVG material, I'd keep looking.

Was this review helpful to you?  YesNo (Report this)



6 of 6 people found the following review helpful:

In a Nutshell, March 16, 2002
Reviewer:Wesley T. Perkins (New Orleans, LA United States) - See all my reviews
This subject perfectly fits O'Reilly's "In a Nutshell" tradition, for SVG itself is just that: Web design, including text, graphics, animation, and programming, all in a nutshell -- concise, pithy, simple, and deep.

SVG, a refactoring of several generations of Web technology and a public standard approved by the World Wide Web Consortium, can be authored without any special tools and without any special background, other than the immediately productive background provided by this book.

Eisenberg swiftly, but with diverting variety, illuminates the process of drawing, assembling shapes, creating textures, transforming coordinates, structuring documents, enriching text, creating reusable components, fine tuning color, animating shapes and colors and structures, creating lighting effects, and programming user interactions. All of this is built upon the simple SVG architecture: arrange your elements in a hierarchy and set their attributes.

There is an art to conveying important points without belaboring them and Eisenberg moves from example to example with perfect pitch.

The book also contains an eight page section with full color images.

Some people have complained about the lack of reference books on SVG. The SVG reference is in fact widely available, all 500+ pages of it, on the W3C site. What is really needed, and would have been useful in this or any SVG book, is a five page guide to using that reference -- how do I, in ten seconds or so, determine whether this element can be a child of that element, or if this element supports this attribute?

While I was developing SVG Composer the only book available was Watt's "Designing SVG Web Graphics" (another fine book with a rather different pitch).. When Eisenberg's work came out I happily relearned SVG, doing every example and picking up any number of new tricks.

I do have some reservations: I didn't care for the cat drawing (hated it!) and the final two chapters on generating and serving SVG seemed aimed at the wrong audience (adepts at Java, servlets, and Perl) though the material itself is perfectly fine.

At first I had the same feeling about the appendices, which include brief samples of subjects from programming to fonts to matrix algebra, that surely Eisenberg was misjudging his audience. However he may have things just right -- SVG may well become the greatest crossover hit ever in computer languages, a lingua franca for logic and art.

Was this review helpful to you?  YesNo (Report this)



Listmania!

So You'd Like to...



Amazon.com Privacy Statement Amazon.com Shipping Information Amazon.com Returns & Exchanges

Where's My Stuff?
• Track your recent orders.
• View or change your orders in Your Account.
Shipping & Returns
• See our shipping rates & policies.
Return an item (here's our Returns Policy).
Need Help?
• Forgot your password? Click here.
Redeem or buy a gift certificate.
Visit our Help department.
Search   for     

Amazon.com Home   |   Directory of All Stores

Our International Sites: Canada  |  United Kingdom  |  Germany  |  Japan  |  France  |  China

Contact Us   |   Help   |   Shopping Cart   |   Your Account   |   Sell Items   |   1-Click Settings

Investor Relations   |   Press Releases   |   Join Our Staff

Conditions of Use | Privacy Notice © 1996-2005, Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates